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Syracuse Crunch raises funds for Red Cross Disaster Relief

Donation sparked by Smithfield tornado and East Syracuse storm damage

In the wake of the tornado and severe storms that hit Central New York on July 8, the Syracuse Crunch recently raised more than $1,000 for the American Red Cross through a jersey auction fundraiser. The money raised will go to the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund, which will be used to help provide shelter, food, emotional support and other assistance for victims of future disasters.

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AIDS Walk/Run raises more than $181,000

The 22nd Annual AIDS Walk/Run held June 1 at Beaver Lake Nature Center raised $181,860. Since it began in 1992, the AIDS Walk/Run has been the mainstay funding for ACR Health’s now extensive Adolescent Health Initiatives. The event has raised more than $2.3 million and positioned ACR Health as a state leader in youth education.

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Paige’s Butterfly Run set for June 7

For the 17th consecutive year, Paige’s Butterfly Run will take place on Saturday, June 7, in downtown Syracuse. The event began in 1997, three years after Paige Yeomans Arnold, 8, a student at Palmer Elementary School, died from chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). CML is a disease in which the bone marrow makes too many white blood cells. It usually occurs during or after middle age and rarely occurs in children.

World Ovarian Cancer Day in Syracuse is May 8

On May 8, Central New York’s very own Hope for Heather (hopeforheather.org) joins the global movement to raise awareness about ovarian cancer by pledging to spread the word about ovarian cancer during the second annual World Ovarian Cancer Day (WOCD).

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Team Believe raises money for area charities through running

Running a 10-mile race is a tremendous challenge. But if you’ve got the right motivation, those 10 miles can feel like nothing at all. That’s the idea behind Team Believe, a grassroots organization that brings together local runners to help the Central New York community. The group, which got its start in 2009, asks participants to help raise money for local children’s charities while training for the Dunn Tire Mountain Goat Run in Syracuse in May.

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Is ‘Ash for Trash’ the way to go?

Public opinion split on idea to import trash from Cortland County

For 20 years, the waste-to-energy facility on Rock Cut Road in Jamesville has been Onondaga County’s answer to waste management. However, starting in 2015, Cortland County may also have the opportunity to bring its trash to the site through a potential agreement called “Ash for Trash.”

Kicking off the New Year right

It is that time of year again — time to “set New Year’s resolutions,” “get in shape,” “work on the waist line,” “go on a diet,” “start fresh,” whatever you want to call it, most people feel the need to reevaluate their habits in January after all the holiday hoopla is over. Usually diet and exercise habits rank high on the list of “needs improvement.” On Jan. 1 (or maybe Jan. 2), the “hard core dieters” and the “gung-ho gym members” begin their quest. They sweat, grunt, groan, “give up carbs” and step on the scale every day. A month later, most of them find themselves exhausted, sore, injured, hungry, deprived, miserable and frustrated (maybe even a few other adjectives). They may or may not be in better shape or weigh less. If you plan on trying this approach, please reconsider. If you want long lasting success and really want to feel better emotionally and physically, please try this approach…

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Cycle for safety

The 2013 Syracuse Ride for Missing Children to be held this week

If you enjoy company while cycling long distances, why not consider riding for a cause? The 2013 Syracuse Ride for Missing children, a 100-mile police escorted bicycle ride through Syracuse and parts of Central New York, is taking place this Friday, Sept. 27. Sponsored by the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children/New York (NCMEC/NY), the event serves three purposes.

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To have and to hold, part 2: Marcellus woman launches menopause Facebook groups

Part 2: Susan Garritillo. This two-part story package explores the individual accomplishments and undivided love of a Marcellus couple. See Part 1: Jerry Garritillo to learn more.

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Vernak Country Store to host Wellness Day Aug. 10

Vernak Farms Country Store and Compounding Pharmacy, 1889 East Lake Road, Skaneateles, will hold its first annual Wellness Day on Friday, Aug. 10 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Kids with cancer: Part V: Survivors continue to deal with side effects from treatment

As it turned out, Erin Hannagan was one of the lucky ones. Hannagan was 16 when she was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s disease May 25, 1993. But she would beat the disease. “I had been coughing for quite some time and had been diagnosed with multiple ‘colds,’” Hannagan recalled. “It finally got so bad that my mom took me to an urgent care center where a chest X-ray was done that revealed a large mediastinal [cavity containing the heart, esophagus, trachea, thymus and aorta] mass.”

Kids with cancer: Part IV: Community organizations, individuals provide relief to young patients

Maureen Humphrey lost her child to cancer, but not in the traditional sense. Humphrey was pregnant in June of 2001 when she learned that she had clear cell adenocarcinoma, a rare and aggressive cervical cancer that necessitated a radical hysterectomy as well as the removal of 28 lymph nodes. “No one ever expects that cancer or illness will happen to them, and we certainly felt the same way,” said Susan Bertrand of Baldwinsville, Humphrey’s older sister. “Maureen's cancer diagnosis was a shock, but worse than the diagnosis was the grief she felt knowing she was going to lose her unborn child and never again have the chance to conceive or carry her own child again.”

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Kids with cancer: Part III: You can help raise money to find a cure

Chris Arnold and Ellen Yeomans thought a bone marrow transplant would cure their daughter’s leukemia. Paige Yeomans Arnold was diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in June of 1993. The cancer is typically found in adults, not children, who are more likely to get acute myelogenous lymphoma (AML) or acute lymphocytic lymphoma (ALL). At first, she was treated with an experimental drug called Interferon, which put her into a brief remission. But a few months later, the cancer returned, leaving the family with just one choice: a bone marrow transplant.

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Kids with cancer: Part I: Families facing devastating diagnosis need support

At first, Melissa Lowell thought her son Nate was just tired. “This time last year [he started getting sick],” Melissa said. “It started off, he just had a cough. It was the end of the school year and he seemed fatigued. It was nothing out of the ordinary. I just figured it was because school was over. He was leaving a teacher he loved. He gets emotional with change, as any kid does.” But the cough didn’t go away. Nate, then 10, was complaining that he couldn’t breathe, couldn’t swallow. After a couple of weeks, Melissa and her husband Jimmy took him to an urgent care facility near their home in Herkimer County. He was diagnosed with asthma and given prednisone and an inhaler, which helped at first, but soon proved ineffective. A visit to Nate’s pediatrician July 3, 2012, suggested pneumonia.

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CNY SPD Parent-Connections offers support for parents of children with sensory processing disorders

When Caryn Daher’s son, Jon, was little, he was into everything — even more than the average toddler. “He was… constantly bumping and crashing into things and people and seeking-jumping type activities,” said Daher, a Cicero resident. “He had difficulty in regulating and responding to movement activities appropriately. It went far beyond a ‘busy’ toddler.” In addition, Jon struggled with a variety of sounds, often withdrawing or avoiding certain situations because of the noise level. He had higher-than-average sensitivities to food, temperature and touch. In addition, his speech was delayed. It was that delay that led to help for his other issues. Through his speech therapist, Jon was diagnosed with Sensory Processing Disorder.

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